Ceredigion Historical Society
Aberaeron Harbour Boats - Discover the archaeology, antiquities and history of Ceredigion

BEST 8 Articles on Aberaeron History, Harbour & Archaeology

Aberaeron history, archaeology and antiquities, is a historic seaside town in Ceredigion, West Wales. Situated on the Cardigan Bay coastline, between Aberarth and Ffos-y-ffin.

What county is Aberaeron in? Aberaeron (formerly anglicised as Aberayron) is a seaside town, community and electoral ward in Ceredigion, Wales.

What is the population of Aberaeron? The population of Aberaeron was 1,520 in 2001, reducing to 1,422 in the 2011 census.

How far is Aberaeron from Aberystwyth? The distance between Aberaeron and Aberystwyth by road is 16.3 miles.

How far is New Quay Wales from Aberaeron? The distance between New Quay and Aberaeron by road is 7.5 miles.

  • Aberaeron boats and harbour - Discover the archaeology, antiquities and history of Ceredigion
  • Aerial photo of Aberaeron Harbour - Discover the archaeology, antiquities and history of Ceredigion
  • Aberaeron Harbour at low tide - Discover the archaeology, antiquities and history of Ceredigion
  • Aberaeron Harbour Boats - Discover the archaeology, antiquities and history of Ceredigion
  • Aberaeron Pier - Discover the archaeology, antiquities and history of Ceredigion
  • Habour at Aberaeron boats at low tide - Discover the archaeology, antiquities and history of Ceredigion
  • Harbourmaster Hotel Aberaeron - Discover the archaeology, antiquities and history of Ceredigion

Aberaeron History Pictures
Vanished and Vanishing Cardiganshire - Bont Cottage Aberaeron
Bont Cottage Aberaeron

Aberaeron History and Harbour Ceredigion
Aberaeron habour

Since 1909 the Ceredigion Historical Society has published articles written about the archaeology, antiquities and history of Ceredigion, many of these articles printed within the Ceredigion Journal, are about the history of Aberaeron.

The society has also produced three county volumes, under the name of the Cardiganshire County History series, these knowledgeable, learned, comprehensive and scholary publications record the history of prehistoric, early and modern Cardiganshire.

1. History

  • Aberaeron was no more than a couple of houses in 1800
  • Aberaeron was planned and built in 1805 by the Rev. Alban Thomas Jones
  • Aberaeron Harbour was built in 1808
  • Aberaeron frequented by small coasting vessels in 1810
  • Aberaeron, Holy Trinity Church was built in 1835
  • Aberaeron suffers a server flood in 1881, damaging the town’s bridge
  • Aberaeron Gondola “tramcar” was erected in 1881
  • Aberaeron Bridge was rebuilt in 1881
  • Aberaeron Railway opened in 1911
  • Aberaeron Railway closed in 1951

In 1808, the building of Aberaeron Harbour, it may be said that the town was born when the Harbour Act was passed. An Act of Parliament was necessary in order to enable Alban Thomas Jones Gwynne to impose tolls and dues. In this Act, dated 1st August, 1807, the owner is designated as Alban Thomas Jones Gwynne, clerk, lord of the said manor of Llyswen, otherwise Aberayron. The building of the new piers and removal of the shingle banks began in 1808 supervised by William Green of Aberystwyth and Edward Ellis of Chancery at a cost of about £6000. The piers were completed by 1809 and the inner harbour excavated after 1811. The harbour was fully completed in 1816.

In 1810, Rees, in his “Description of Cardiganshire,” in 1810, speaks of Aberayron as being “much frequented by small coasting vessels, which convey the corn, and other produce of the district to English markets. The harbour has lately been much improved by erecting of a pier, at the exspense of the Rev. Alban Thomas Jones Gwynne, of Tyglyn, who at his own charge obtained an Act of Parliament for this purpose. It has been of great use to the shipping, and there is a prospect of this becoming a considerable harbour. There has also been a market established here, which promises to be a great convenience to this part of the country. Near the town are some remains of an ancient fortress called Castell Cadwgan, thought to have been erected by King Cadwgan, about 1148.”

In 1814, the building of the first Aberaeron bridge. The bridge was built on shallow foundations and following its construction in the intervening years the bridge had seen many repairs. Rock quarried from the riverside, upstream, next to the river Aeron was used for house-building, and stone taken from the riverbed downstream was used as ballast for empty ships leaving the harbour. Subsequently the river flow was altered, lowering the riverbed under the bridge and weakening its foundations. A severe flood in 1881 demolished the town’s bridge crossing the Aeron river and in the aftermath a new bridge was built.

Aberaeron Shipbuilding, in the course of forty years, sees fifty to seventy ships built. David Jones could fashion a vessel of the finest design draught, tonnage, figure, fittings of masts, rigging, etc., though he knew nothing of book mechanics; and, more wonderful, he first made a perfect miniature model of the ship to be built in exact proportion and actuality. In the great days of ship-building one or two ships were being built at the same time in each of the three ship-building yards. The money made in the building trade was invested in ships. Every family had a share in ships, as in herring nets. In the course of forty years from fifty to seventy ships were built at Aberayron.

In 1835, the original Holy Trinity Church, Aberaeron, was built for Colonel Gwynne by Edward Haycock of Shrewsbury. The church was later rebuilt in 1872 and consecrated in 1875, built to an early Gothic style by Middleton & Goodman of Cheltenham.

In 1876, The census return for co. Cardigan, just issued, gives the Aberayron Urban District (which by a Local Government Board Order, coming into operation on 20th September, 1892. Includes parts of the civil parishes of Henfynyw and Llanddewi Aberarth) an area of 387 staute acres, with 375 inhabited houses, in which live 1,331 persons.

In 1881, Aberaeron gondola suspended from a cable was built. Originally set up to allow Captain John Evans to connect his home to his timber sawmill on the opposite shore, after a severe flood that damaged the town’s lower bridge in 1881. By the following year 1882, Capt Evans was opening his “tramcar” to the public on fair days. The hand-powered cable car was winched across the river Aeron by an attendant and the return fare cost one penny. With its popularity it soon became known as the “carriage bach” (little carriage). Visiting tall ships had the cable lowered to the riverbed to pass at high tide, to reach or leave the area of the harbour. After each summer the equipment was removed from the harbour and stored over winter. By 1885 publican and coal merchant Evan Loyn had installed his own version of the ride. The gondola now called the “Aeron Express” in July 1896, 1,000 halfpenny fares were paid for the ride, and by the summer of 1901 the ride had carried around 12,500 fee paying passengers. The ride continued to operate until the early 1930s. A replica crossed the river for several years in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

In 1911, the Aberaeron Railway opened, at a cost of over £80,000 to build. The Railway Contract was for £72,864, and the final build cost exceeded £80,000. This miracle must primarily be attributed to Mr. Harford. Aberayron Station was the terminus of the former Lampeter, Aberayron & New Quay Light Railway.

In 1951, the Aberaeron Railway closed to passengers, and in 1965 it ceased transporting goods. The section between Aberaeron Junction and Green Grove siding which served the Felinfach Creamery closed in 1973.

1.1 Bont Cottage, Aberaeron

Transactions of the Cardiganshire Antiquarian Society, 1915, Vol 2, No 1

1.2 The Birth and Growth of Aberayron

Transactions of the Cardiganshire Antiquarian Society, 1926, Vol 4

1.3 Aberaeron Landmarks – By Gwilym Jones – 53

Ceredigion – Journal of the Cardiganshire Antiquarian Society, 1950 Vol I No I

1.4 Aberaeron: The Community and Seafaring, 1800-1900 – By David Lewis Jones

Ceredigion – Journal of the Cardiganshire Antiquarian Society, 1969 Vol VI No 2

1.5 Notes on Aberaeron – By Gwilym M. Jones- p285

Ceredigion – Journal of the Cardiganshire Antiquarian Society, 1970 Vol VI No 3

1.6 The Architecture of Aberaeron – By J. E. Griffiths – p295

Ceredigion – Journal of the Cardiganshire Antiquarian Society, 1970 Vol VI No 3

1.7 The planning of Aberaeron – By Henry Phythian-Adams – p389

Ceredigion – Journal of the Cardiganshire Antiquarian Society, 1979 Vol VIII No 4

1.8 Aberaeron Before The Harbour Act of 1807 – By D. L. Jones – p363

Ceredigion – Journal of the Cardiganshire Antiquarian Society, 1983 Vol IX No 4

1.9 A Group of Burnt Mounds at Morfa Mawr, Aberaeron – By George Williams – p181

Ceredigion – Journal of the Cardiganshire Antiquarian Society, 1985 Vol X No 2

Back to top ↑

Harbourmaster Hotel Aberaeron - Built for the Harbourmaster, with a tavern on the first floor. It became known as the Harbourmaster in the early 1960s.
Harbourmaster Hotel Aberaeron – Built for the Harbourmaster, with a tavern on the first floor. It became known as the Harbourmaster in the early 1960s.

2. Index

Index to Ceredigion Journal, Volumes I-X, 1950-84

  • Aberaeron, iv:119; ix:181,182,183
    • Aeron woollen mills, vi:lll,117
    • and the James family of Tyglyn Aeron iv, 196-7
    • architecture, vi:295-8
    • argraffu, viii:204
    • Bar, vi:203
    • bibliography, iv:299
    • blacksmiths, iv:224; vi:100
    • bridge, i:53-5; vi:292; ix:378-9
    • castle, iii:68
    • chapel-of-ease, iv:121
    • clwb cyfeillgar, iii:24comisiwn tir, iv:356,372
    • corn mill, vi:97
    • county hall, i:56; vi:288,290
    • court leet records, vi:286
    • craftsmen, vi:91
    • eisteddfod, 1864, v:364
    • emigration
      • see Aberaeron: ymfudo
    • exports, 18c, vi:202
    • fire brigade, ix:360
    • fishing fleet, i:58-9
    • friendly society
      • see Aberaeron : clwb cyfeillgar
    • harbour, vi:203-08,211; ix:377
    • Harbour Act, 1807, vi:201,203-05,207; vii:274
    • herring boats, vi:202
    • herring fishing, vi:121
    • herring trade, i:57-9
    • Holy Trinity Chapel, vi:292,293; viii:407; ix:168;x:86,88
    • hospital, vi:293
    • iforiaid, iii:28
    • imports, 17c, vi:201
    • ivorites
      • see Aberaeron: iforiaid
    • labourers’ diet,1837, x:42
    • limekilns, vi:203,209,289
    • map, ii:262
    • mill and forge, v:121
    • neuadd y dre, v:368
    • Peniel chapel, v:368; vi:293
    • Petty Sessions, vi:288
    • pier, i:61; v:367-8; vi:203-07
    • planning of, viii:404-07
    • poblogaeth, v:369
    • population
      • see Aberaeron: poblogaeth
    • port and harbour, i:57-62
    • public free library, vi:290
    • salt imports, vii:273
    • schools, i:62, x:369
      • British school, ii:155; iv:358,367,372
      • Commercial and Navigation school, vi:224
      • Girls’ school, ii:152
      • Grammar school, ix:199
      • Intermediate school, viii:53-60,62
      • National school, vi:293; x:94
      • National schoolhouse
        • see Aberaeron: schools: Ysgoldy
        • Cenedlaethol
      • secondary school
        • see Aberaeron: schools: ysgol uwchradd
      • Ysgol Glan y Môr, vi:288, 292
      • ysgol uwchradd, ix:181
      • Ysgoldy Cenedlaethol, v:369
    • shipbuilding, vi:217-22; viii:305
    • stocks, vi:290
    • streets
      • see Aberaeron: strydoedd
    • strydoedd, v:369
    • Tabernacl CM. chapel, iv:116; v:368; vi:293
    • trading records, vii:273
    • Trinity chapel, x:86
    • turnpike gate, ii:106; vi:28
    • warehouses, i:56
    • Wesleyan chapel, vii:293
    • woollen mills, vi:lll,117
    • workhouse, v:369; vi:293; viii:251-2,255,274
    • ymfudo, ii:167
      • see also Aberayron
  • Aberaeron and Bristol Navigation Company, vi:210
  • Aberaeron Benefit Society, vi:288
  • Aberaeron billhook, iv:213; vi:90,103
  • Aberaeron Club, ix:383-4; x:45
  • Aberaeron Ganol, i:56; vi:290; ix:382
  • Aberaeron Isaf (small holding), i:56
  • Aberaeron Isaf (straw thatched house), vi:289; ix:382
  • Aberaeron Monumental Works, viii:352
  • Aberaeron Mutual Protection Club, iv:169
  • Aberaeron Rural District Council, iv:280
  • Aberaeron shovel, v:121; vi:103
  • Aberaeron Steam Navigation Company
    • see Aberayron Steam Navigation Company
  • Aberaeron Steam Packet Company, vi:210, 212-14
  • Aberaeron Ucha, inn, tavern and brewery, ix:382
  • Aberaeron Uchaf, i:54,56-7; vi:289,290
  • Aberaeron Union, viii:246-9,251-2,263,274
  • Aberaeron Urban District Council, iv:280
  • Aberayron Deep Sea Fishing Company, vi:215, 218
  • Aberayron Mutual Ship Insurance Society Ltd., vi:228
  • Aberayron Steam Navigation Company, ii:99; vi:210-12

Back to top ↑

Rev. Alban Thomas Jones Gwynne, of Ty-Glyn, who, in 1807, obtained an act of parliament, under the authority of which he built two piers at the mouth of the river Aeron, with convenient wharfs, cranes, and storehouses, at an expense of about £6000.
Rev. Alban Thomas Jones Gwynne, of Ty-Glyn, who, in 1807, obtained an act of parliament, under the authority of which he built two piers at the mouth of the river Aeron, with convenient wharfs, cranes, and storehouses, at an expense of about £6000.

3. Illustrations

Index to Illustrations, Ceredigion Journal, Volumes I-X, 1950-84

  • Aberaeron harbour in 1832, facing vi:216 pl.9
  • Aberaeron harbour in the 1890s, facing vi:217 pl.10
  • Aberaeron in the 1850s. Ship-building at, facing vi:232 pl.11
  • Aberaeron waterwheel, facing v:117 pl.7

Back to top ↑

4. Education

  • schools, i:62, x:369
    • British school, ii:155; iv:358,367,372
    • Commercial and Navigation school, vi:224
    • Girls’ school, ii:152
    • Grammar school, ix:199
    • Intermediate school, viii:53-60,62
    • National school, vi:293; x:94
    • National schoolhouse
      • see Aberaeron: schools: Ysgoldy
      • Cenedlaethol
    • secondary school
      • see Aberaeron: schools: ysgol uwchradd
    • Ysgol Glan y Môr, vi:288, 292
    • ysgol uwchradd, ix:181
    • Ysgoldy Cenedlaethol, v:369

Back to top ↑

5. Industry

  • Aeron woollen mills, vi:lll,117
  • blacksmiths, iv:224; vi:100
  • corn mill, vi:97
  • craftsmen, vi:91
  • imports, 17c, vi:201
  • labourers’ diet,1837, x:42
  • limekilns, vi:203,209,289
  • map, ii:262
  • mill and forge, v:121
  • salt imports, vii:273
  • trading records, vii:273
  • warehouses, i:56
  • woollen mills, vi:lll,117
  • workhouse, v:369; vi:293; viii:251-2,255,274
  • Aberaeron and Bristol Navigation Company, vi:210
  • Aberaeron Monumental Works, viii:352
  • Aberaeron Steam Navigation Company
    • see Aberayron Steam Navigation Company
  • Aberaeron Steam Packet Company, vi:210, 212-14
  • Aberayron Deep Sea Fishing Company, vi:215, 218
  • Aberayron Mutual Ship Insurance Society Ltd., vi:228
  • Aberayron Steam Navigation Company, ii:99; vi:210-12

Back to top ↑

6. Administration

  • county hall, i:56; vi:288,290
    • neuadd y dre, v:368
  • court leet records, vi:286
  • Petty Sessions, vi:288
  • Aberaeron Urban District Council, iv:280

Back to top ↑

7. Health

  • hospital, vi:293

Back to top ↑

8. Seafaring

Aberaeron Harbour was built by Rev. Alban Thomas Jones Gwynne, of Ty-Glyn, who, in 1807, obtained an act of parliament to build the port, at an expense of about £6000.

  • fishing fleet, i:58-9
  • harbour, vi:203-08,211; ix:377
  • Harbour Act, 1807, vi:201,203-05,207; vii:274
  • herring boats, vi:202
  • herring fishing, vi:121
  • herring trade, i:57-9
  • pier, i:61; v:367-8; vi:203-07
  • port and harbour, i:57-62
  • shipbuilding, vi:217-22; viii:305

Back to top ↑

9. Religion

  • Peniel chapel, v:368; vi:293
  • Tabernacl CM. chapel, iv:116; v:368; vi:293
  • Trinity chapel, x:86
  • Wesleyan chapel, vii:293

Back to top ↑

10. Map

View Larger Map of Aberaeron

List of Street Names in Aberaeron, Sir Ceredigion / Cardiganshire, Wales, United Kingdom. Road map, streets, routes, places and buildings.

  • A
    • Alban Court
    • Alban Square
    • Albert Street
  • B
    • Beach Parade
    • Belle View Terrace
    • Belle Vue Gardens
    • Berllan Deg
    • Bridge Street
    • Broceri
    • Broddewi
    • Bryn-y-mor Terrace
    • Bro Allt-y-graig
    • Bro Yr Hafan
    • Bryn Road
    • Bryn-y-mor
  • C
    • Cadwgan Place
    • Cardigan Road
    • Castle Lane
    • Chalybeate Gardens
    • Chalybeate Street
    • Clos Pencarreg
    • Coed Y Bryn
    • Crown Place
    • Cylch Aeron
  • D
    • Darkgate Street
    • Dolheulog
    • Drury Lane
  • F
    • Fford Y Goitre
    • Ffordd Y Gaer
    • Ffordd Y Gogledd
  • G
    • Glan Y Mor
    • Glan-afon
    • Godre Rhiwgoch
    • Goetre Road
    • Greenland Terrace
    • Groes-ffordd
  • H
    • Harbour Lane
    • Heol Crefftwyr
    • Heol Frenhines
    • Heol Gambia
    • Heol Gwyn
    • Heol Llyswen
    • Heol Tudor
    • Heol Y Bryn
    • Heol Y Dwr
    • Heol Y Farchnad
    • Heol Yr Odyn
    • Heol-y-tywysog
  • L
    • Lampeter Road
    • Lon Ganol
    • Lon Parc Y Fro
    • Lon Peniel
    • Lon Y Castell
    • Lon Y Felin
    • Lon Yr Hafen
    • Lower Regent Street
  • M
    • Maes Iwan
    • Maes Y Meillion
    • Maes Yr Heli
    • Market Street
    • Masons Road
  • N
    • Newfoundland Terrace
    • North Parade
    • North Road
    • North Victoria Street
  • O
    • Oxford Street
  • P
    • Pant Y Gof
    • Panteg Road
    • Parc Ffos
    • Pen Y Bryn
    • Pen Cei
    • Peniel Lane
    • Penlon
    • Penmaesglas
    • Picton Terrace
    • Portland Place
    • Princes Avenue
  • Q
    • Quay Parade
    • Queen Street
  • R
    • Regent Street
    • Rhiwgoch
    • Rhydfach
  • S
    • Sgwan Alban
    • Sgwan Alban
    • Sgwan Alban
    • Ship Street
    • South Road
    • Stryd Buddug
    • Stryd Tyglyn
    • Stryd Y Bont
    • Stryd Y Fro
    • Stryd Y Tabernacle
  • T
    • Tabernacle Street
    • The Terrace
  • V
    • Vicarage Hill
    • Victoria Street
    • Vulcan Place
  • W
    • Water Street
    • Waterloo Street
    • Wellington Gardens
    • Wellington Street
    • Wernmeirch
  • Y
    • Y Werydd

Back to top ↑

11. A Topographical Dictionary of Wales

Originally published by: Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales (London, Fourth edition, 1849)

ABERAERON, or ABERAYRON (ABERAERON), a sea-port, and rising watering-place, partly in the parish of Hênvynyw, but principally in that of Llandewy-Aberarth, lower division of the hundred of Ilar, county of Cardigan, South Wales, 16 miles (S. W. by S.) from Aberystwith, and 23 (E. N. E.) from Cardigan; containing 534 inhabitants. The village is agreeably situated on the road from Cardigan to Aberystwith, at the lower extremity of the Vale of Aëron, the sides of which are in this part abrupt, and clothed with wood; and on the shore of Cardigan bay, at the influx of the river Aëron. This river here separates the parishes of Hênvynyw and Llandewy-Aberarth, and, with some springs in the neighbourhood, affords the inhabitants an ample supply of water; it is noted for trout and salmon, and there are several corn-mills on its banks. Aberaëron is indebted for its origin to the late Rev. Alban Thomas Jones Gwynne, of Ty-Glyn, who, in 1807, obtained an act of parliament, under the authority of which he built two piers at the mouth of the river Aëron, with convenient wharfs, cranes, and storehouses, at an expense of about £6000. The pier on the west was one hundred yards in length, and the other ninety, and both were built of stone; but, from the very exposed situation of the place, they were insufficient to afford adequate protection to vessels from the violence of north-westerly winds. To remove this inconvenience, it was necessary for the present proprietor, Colonel Gwynne, to extend the western pier about one hundred yards, inclining in a northern direction; which has been effected. The scenery of the Vale of Aëron is particularly beautiful, and, together with the marine atmosphere of the village, its retired situation, and improving condition, may render this, at no distant period, a place of very considerable resort during summer. Upwards of thirty new leases were granted some years ago, pursuant to which a number of houses have been built: a post-office, and an excellent posting-house and hotel, have also been established, the latter affording to families an equal degree of comfort and privacy to any inns in the principality. In 1835 an act was obtained for making and maintaining a road from New-Quay to this place.

The port is a member of that of Aberystwith, and is in a thriving state. There are from thirty to forty sloops belonging to it, of from seventeen to one hundred tons’ burthen, which are navigated by about 120 seamen: they are chiefly employed in the importation of coal and culm, and two of them trade regularly with Bristol. The principal articles of importation, in addition, are grocery and timber; and of exportation, butter and oats: there is also a lucrative herring fishery, in which about thirty boats, with seven men to each, are engaged. Near the entrance into the harbour is a bar, which is dry at low water. The merchants’ stores are open weekly, on Wednesday, for the reception of corn; and markets for provisions, &c., are now held every Wednesday and Saturday, under the auspices of Colonel Gwynne, proprietor of the manor: a fair for hiring servants takes place on Nov. 13th. All the quarter-sessions of the county are held here, and there are petty-sessions once a month, for the whole of the Aberaëron poor-law union: one of the county debt-courts established in 1847 is also fixed here, with jurisdiction over the union; and courts leet for the manor are held in May and October. There are places of worship for dissenters, and several schools. The poor-law union of which this place is the head, comprehends the fourteen parishes and townships of Ciliau-Aëron, Cydplwyv, Dihewyd, Hênvynyw, Kilkennin, Llanarth, Llanbadarn-Trêveglwys, Llandewy-Aberarth, Llandysilio-Gogo, Llanerchaeron, Llanina, Llanllwchairn, Llansantfraid with Llanon, and Llanvihangel-Ystrad. It is under the superintendence of sixteen guardians, and contains a population of upwards of 12,874.

Mynach-dy, the property and residence of Col. Gwynne, situated at a short distance from the village, is supposed, from its name, which signifies “monastery,” to have been anciently a small ecclesiastical establishment: in the grounds are some tumuli, called Hên Gastell, of obscure origin. On the sea-shore, near the village, is a circular encampment, designated Castell Cadwgan, and supposed to have been constructed by Cadwgan ab Bleddyn, about 1148.

Back to top ↑

Back to top ↑

13. References

  • Samuel Lewis, ‘Abbey – Aberfraw’, in A Topographical Dictionary of Wales (London, 1849), pp. 1-12. British History Online [accessed 8 August 2019].

Back to top ↑

Some ideas to share your Stories below!

Have a memory and your not sure what to write? We have made it easy with some prompts and ideas, just think about this place and the importance its had in your life and ask yourself:

  • What are my personal memories of living here?
  • How has it developed and shops changed over the years?
  • Do you have a story about the beach, community, its people and history?
  • Tell us how it feels, seeing photographs and images of this place again?
  • Tell us your favourite memories about this place?

The aim of the Ceredigion Historical Society is to preserve, record and promote the study of the archaeology, antiquities and history of Ceredigion. That objective has remained the same since the foundation of the Society in 1909, though its name was changed from Ceredigion Antiquarian Society to the Ceredigion Historical Society in 2002.

Back to top ↑

See:
Index | Towns in Ceredigion | Villages in Ceredigion | Historic Sites in Ceredigion

2 thoughts on “BEST 8 Articles on Aberaeron History, Harbour & Archaeology

  1. In 2009 i bought antique heavy mantel clock that in 1909 was given to Bertha M. Jones Holy Trinity church of Aberayron organist in her marriage. Vikar replied to me tbere was record of it…But i never found her name in historical sources. May be she moved to US…Interesting.
    Mappin and Webb Paris clock.

Leave a Reply