Ceredigion Historical Society
History of Aberporth - Discover the archaeology, antiquities and history of Ceredigion

Aberporth History

Aberporth history, archaeology and antiquities. Is a town in Ceredigion, West Wales. Situated close the Cardigan Bay coastline, between Gwbert and New Quay.

Table of Contents

1. History
2. Index
3. Illustrations
4. Education
5. Industry
6. Seafaring
7. Religion
8. Map
9. Topography
10. Gallery
11. Links

  • History of Aberporth - Discover the archaeology, antiquities and history of Ceredigion
  • Aberporth History - Discover the archaeology, antiquities and history of Ceredigion

History of Aberporth
Cardiganshire Fonts - Aberporth
Sketch of Aberporth church

Aberporth History Ceredigion view of coastal village
History of Aberporth

Since 1909 the Ceredigion Historical Society has published articles written about the archaeology, antiquities and history of Ceredigion, many of these articles printed within the Ceredigion Journal, are about the history of Aberporth.

The society has also produced three county volumes, under the name of the Cardiganshire County History series, these knowledgeable, learned, comprehensive and scholary publications record the history of prehistoric, early and modern Cardiganshire.

1. History

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2. Index

  • anghydffurfiaeth, iv:96,97,99,108,l 10
  • corn mill, vi:97
  • emigration
    • see Aber-porth: ymfudo
  • Hen Gapel, x:418-19
  • herring industry, vi:121; ix:l 12-13
  • iforiaid, iii:28
  • ivorites
    • see Aber-porth: iforiaid
  • methodism
    • see Aber-porth : methodistiaeth gynnar
  • methodistiaeth gynnar, v:6,10,13
  • nonconformity
    • see Aber-porth: anghydffurfiaeth
  • offloading cargo on the open beach at, vii:295
  • population figures, 1801-51, vi:391
  • population trend, vii:259
  • schools
    • dissenting school in 1847, ii:139
    • salary of schoolmaster, ii:151
  • shipbuilding, ix:122
    • trade in the seventeenth century, iii:234
  • ymfudo, ii:167

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3. Illustrations

Cardiganshire Fonts - Aberporth
Cardiganshire Fonts – Aberporth

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4. Education

  • schools
    • dissenting school in 1847, ii:139
    • salary of schoolmaster, ii:151

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5. Industry

  • corn mill, vi:97
  • herring industry, vi:121; ix:l 12-13

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6. Seafaring

  • herring industry, vi:121; ix:l 12-13
  • offloading cargo on the open beach at, vii:295
  • shipbuilding, ix:122
    • trade in the seventeenth century, iii:234

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7. Religion

  • Hen Gapel, x:418-19
  • methodism
    • see Aber-porth : methodistiaeth gynnar
  • methodistiaeth gynnar, v:6,10,13
  • nonconformity
    • see Aber-porth: anghydffurfiaeth

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8. Map

View Larger Map of Aberporth

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9. A Topographical Dictionary of Wales

Originally published by: Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales (London, Fourth edition, 1849)

ABERPORTH (ABER-PORTH), a parish, in the union of Cardigan, lower division of the hundred of Troedyraur, county of Cardigan, South Wales, 6 miles (N. E.) from Cardigan; containing 496 inhabitants. This place is pleasantly situated on the shore of Cardigan bay, in a cove near the mouth of the river Howny, forming a commodious though small port, which is a creek to the port of Cardigan. A brisk trade is carried on in limestone, culm, and coal, with Milford, Swansea, and Liverpool, employing numerous sloops and seamen, porters, and lime-burners: the herring-fishery in the bay also gives occupation to a great number of hands, and during the season imparts an appearance of activity and bustle to the village; but the fishing for turbot, cod, and mackerel, is scarcely worth pursuing. Aberporth is resorted to in summer for sea-bathing. In the vicinity is Cribach Road, which affords good shelter for vessels, and was much frequented by the French, during former wars with that people. The parish is bounded on the north by the sea, on the east by Blaenporth, on the south by Tremaen, and on the west by Verwic. It consists of two hamlets, the rectorial hamlet and that of Llanannerch. Of the latter the tithes are impropriate in the family of Currie, who pay annually to the rector one mark at Easter; it includes the manors of Mortimer îs Syrwen and Mortimer îs Coed. In the hamlet of Llanannerch, according to tradition, was anciently a chapel; but not the slightest vestiges of it now remain.

The parish contains, according to a survey taken in 1839, an area of 2100 acres, of which 1300 are in the rectorial, and 800 in the impropriate, hamlet, the former comprehending 400 acres of arable land, 100 of meadow, and 800 of pasture; and the latter, 250 acres of arable, 50 of meadow, and 500 of pasture. The soil consists partly of loam and clay, partly of gravel and peat, and, when manured with lime, seasand, and dung, yields barley inferior to none on this coast. It is also tolerably productive of oats, but the wheat crops are very indifferent. The lands are destitute of large trees, but are ornamented in several places with clusters of oak, ash, sycamore, and alder; the surface for the most part is hilly, with a few vales intersected by rapid streams, the principal of these being the river Howny, which separates the parish on the east from that of Blaenporth. The rocks on the coast are very precipitous, and afford retreats for numerous foxes and other animals prejudicial to the farmer; the sea abounds with porpoises and seacalves. A lofty hill in the parish commands fine views of Cardigan bay, and the mountains of Snowdon, Cader Idris, and Plinlimmon, the prospect on a clear day extending a considerable distance beyond the Irish coast. The estate of Plâs, belonging to the family of Morgan, has a mansion of great antiquity, built in the form of a cross; this demesne, as well as that of Pennarissa, formerly exhibited some fine timber, which has given place to a few ornamental plantations. The other seats are, Penralt, erected in the year 1813, a mansion in the Elizabethan style; and Penmar, which has been modernised by Dr. Jones.

The living is a discharged rectory, rated in the king’s books at £5. 13. 9., and endowed with £200 royal bounty, and £800 parliamentary grant; patron, the Bishop of St. David’s: the rectorial tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £104. 13. 4., and the impropriate for one of £57. 6. 8. The church, dedicated to St. Cynwyl, is a small plain structure of great antiquity, situated on an eminence about one mile from the village, and commanding a beautiful view of the sea. It consists of a nave and chancel, separated by a pointed arch, and measures in length forty-six feet and a half, in breadth twentytwo, and in height thirty, exclusively of the steeple, which is fifteen feet higher. The font is a square basin, placed on a round pillar; the sacramental cup is highly ornamented, but has neither date nor inscription. There are places of worship for congregations of Calvinistic Methodists at Aberporth and Blaenannerch, with a Sunday school for adults and children held in each of them.

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  • Coflein, discover the archaeology, historic buildings, monuments and history of Aberporth, Ceredigion
  • Historic Place Names, learn about the field names and house names in the community of Aberporth
  • A Pint of History, read about the history of Ceredigion pub’s, inn’s and local taverns of Aberporth
  • People’s Collection Wales, share your stories, memories and photographs of Aberporth

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Some ideas to share your Stories below!

Have a memory and your not sure what to write? We have made it easy with some prompts and ideas, just think about this place and the importance its had in your life and ask yourself:

  • What are my personal memories of living here?
  • How has it developed and shops changed over the years?
  • Do you have a story about the beach, community, its people and history?
  • Tell us how it feels, seeing photographs and images of this place again?
  • Tell us your favourite memories about this place?

The aim of the Ceredigion Historical Society is to preserve, record and promote the study of the archaeology, antiquities and history of Ceredigion. That objective has remained the same since the foundation of the Society in 1909, though its name was changed from Ceredigion Antiquarian Society to the Ceredigion Historical Society in 2002.

See:
Index | Towns in Ceredigion | Villages in Ceredigion | Historic Sites in Ceredigion | Ceredigion Listed Buildings | Ceredigion Scheduled Monuments | Ceredigion Parks and Gardens

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