CEREDIGION HISTORICAL SOCIETY
History of Talybont pubs in the county old county of Cardiganshire

Talybont History

Talybont and its archaeology, antiquities and history. Is a historic village in Ceredigion, formerly Cardiganshire, West Wales. Situated between Bow Street and Taliesin.

Table of Contents
1. History
2. Map
3. Links

  • History of the Black Lion Hotel, Talybont, in the county old county of Cardiganshire
  • Talybont history - Discover the archaeology, antiquities and history of Ceredigion
  • Talybont archaeology - Discover the archaeology, antiquities and history of Ceredigion
  • History of the White Lion, Talybont, in the county old county of Cardiganshire
  • Talybont antiquity - Discover the archaeology, antiquities and history of Cardiganshire
  • Image of Talybont antiqities - Discover the archaeology, antiquities and history of Ceredigion
  • History of Talybont pubs in the county old county of Cardiganshire
  • Aerial view of historic Talybont - Discover the archaeology, antiquities and history of Ceredigion

Talybont, Ceredigion, West Wales – a small historic village in the former county of Cardiganshire

Talybont History Pictures
Site plan of Caer Lletty Llwyd
Site plan of Caer Lletty Llwyd

Since 1909 the Ceredigion Historical Society has had articles written about the archaeology, antiquities and history of Ceredigion, many of the articles are about Talybont history.

The aim of the Ceredigion Historical Society is to preserve, record and promote the study of the archaeology, antiquities and history of Ceredigion. That objective has remained the same since the foundation of the Society in 1909, though its name was changed from Ceredigion Antiquarian Society to the Ceredigion Historical Society in 2002.

1. Talybont Local History

Waun Wyddyl upland area, located south, east of Talybont.

The history of this small upland area has not been researched. On the tithe map (Llanfihangel Geneu’r glyn, 1847) it is shown unenclosed, and was probably considered Crown land, a situation that is likely to have prevailed for several centuries prior to 1847. In the second half of the 19th century the area was divided into very large fields. A wind farm has now been established here.

Description and essential historic landscape components

This area consists of a rounded hill, which achieves heights of over 340m. Generally the hillsides run down to 250m, but some of the steeper lower slopes descend to less than 150m.

Formerly it was divided into large fields by earth banks – there are no hedges present now, though gorse bushes grow on some banks – but these are now largely redundant and wire fences now provide stock-proof boundaries.

Improved grazing dominates, but rushy and peaty hollows are present as well as rough grazing and bracken on the steeper slopes. There are no inhabited settlements. A short-lived (opened 1897) railway/tramway traverses the lower northern slopes. A wind farm has recently been constructed on the crest of the hill.

The recorded archaeology is dominated by the remains of minor metal mines on the northern flanks and summit of the area. An impressive Iron Age fort, Pen Dinas, two possible Bronze Age round barrows and two possible Bronze Age standing stones provide time-depth to this landscape.

By Dyfed Archaeological Trust – Historic Landscape Characterisation of Talybont

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2. Map

View Larger Map of Talybont

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Some ideas to share your Stories below!

Have a memory and your not sure what to write? We have made it easy with some prompts and ideas, just think about this place and the importance its had in your life and ask yourself:

  • What are my personal memories of living here?
  • How has it developed and shops changed over the years?
  • Do you have a story about the beach, community, its people and history?
  • Tell us how it feels, seeing photographs and images of this place again?
  • Tell us your favourite memories about this place?

The aim of the Ceredigion Historical Society is to preserve, record and promote the study of the archaeology, antiquities and history of Ceredigion. That objective has remained the same since the foundation of the Society in 1909, though its name was changed from Ceredigion Antiquarian Society to the Ceredigion Historical Society in 2002.

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  • Coflein, discover the archaeology, historic buildings, monuments and history of Silian, Ceredigion
  • Historic Place Names, learn about the field names and house names in the community of Silian
  • A Pint of History, read about the history of Ceredigion pub’s, inn’s and local taverns of Silian
  • People’s Collection Wales, share your stories, memories and photographs of Silian
See:
Index | Towns in Ceredigion | Villages in Ceredigion | Historic Sites in Ceredigion | Ceredigion Listed Buildings | Ceredigion Scheduled Monuments | Ceredigion Parks and Gardens | Research Organisations
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C. Green
C. Green
16 days ago

HOW TO GET RID OF GHOSTS, SPIRITS, GOBLINS, AND DEVILS, ETC.
In some parts, especially on the borders of Cardiganshire and Carmarthenshire, it is believed that any one carrying a knife in his hands, will never see or be troubled by a spirit, even when passing a haunted spot in the depth of night.

(p190)
“YSPRYD PENPOMPREN PLAS OR A SPIRIT “LAID” IN A BOTTLE.
Penpompren Plas is a small mansion near Talybont in North Cardiganshire. The late Mr. John Jones, Bristol House, informed me that there was a spirit there once troubling the family, and the servants, and especially the head servant who had no peace as the ghost followed the poor man everywhere whenever he went out at night, and often threw water into his face. At last the servant went to a wise man or a conjurer. The Conjurer came with him to Penpompren Plas to “lay” the Spirit, and transformed it into an insect, in a bottle, which was securely corked. Then the bottle was thrown under the river bridge close by.”

From ‘Folk-Lore of West and Mid-Wales’ by J. Ceredig Davies (1911).

C. Green
C. Green
15 days ago

DEATH PORTENTS.
Among the most important of the superstitions of Wales are the death portents and omens; and this is perhaps more or less true of every country. About a generation or two ago, there were to be found almost in every parish some old people who could tell before hand when a death was going to lake place; and even in the present day we hear of an old man or an old woman, here and there, possessing, or supposed to possess, an insight of this kind into the future.

(p198)
“A HORSE SEEING A “TOILI” OR PHANTOM FUNERAL.
The following tale was related to me by Mr. Jones, Bristol House, Talybont:—

A farmer’s wife, who lived in the northern part of Cardiganshire, had gone to Machynlleth Market one day riding a pony. On her journey home that evening she met a “toili” on the road. The pony was the first to notice the spirit-funeral, and the animal refused to go forward, but turned back and stood trembling under the shelter of a big tree till the “toili” had passed. The woman was quite terrified, and as soon as she reached home she rushed into the house and asked her husband to go out and put the pony in the stable, and stated that she felt unwell that night. Soon after this, one of the family died.

Some persons have such clear vision of a phantom funeral, that they are able even to recognise and give the names of the persons that appear in the spectral procession.”

From ‘Folk-Lore of West and Mid-Wales’ by J. Ceredig Davies (1911).

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